Great Design Starts with Great Imagery

My old GE X400. Decent little camera for the price.

I love photography. I’ve enjoyed taking photographs since probably around High School/College time. I took a course at UVU (Then UVSC) called Digital Photography for Beginners. Which was amazing … I don’t recall if we were taught much about composition but, we did learn to use our cameras and it seems like one of the requirements was that we had to take like 2,000 shots over the course (a ridiculously low amount now but, seemed like a ton then) … I remember taking mini road trips with my friend Cody up the canyon, down the canyon … everywhere we could think of, (I don’t even remember where we went the one day to try and take some wildlife shots). Heber and the surrounding area had a ton of opportunity for great photography. Sadly, even though cameras were only 4-5 megapixel then, I don’t have any of the pictures to show. When the class ended I had to turn back in the rental camera (I believe it was a FujiFilm).

I went quite a while without a camera at that point, I got a nice consumer video camera to keep up with my (then baby) son (I was at a point in school that I was working heavily with video and audio also, this could have helped influence the camera choice), phones were starting to have cameras built in, later my ex-wife had I Nikon Coolpix that was amazing for birthdays and whatever so it really wasn’t the first thing on the agenda.

My old GE X400. Decent little camera for the price.
My old GE X400. Decent little camera for the price.

Seems like maybe Mother’s day 2011 or 2012 that my wife bought me a new camera, one with some manual settings and decent resolution. I loved it and was out taking pictures of kids, flowers and about anything that I could see. After some time I began to get frustrated with the amount of grain in my shots as well as the fact that it would go through batteries faster than … well, we’ll just say faster than anything.

 

My daughter Layla acquired my old camera when I upgraded. She instantly ran the batteries dead and nearly filled the 8GB SD Card.
My daughter Layla acquired my old camera when I upgraded. She instantly ran the batteries dead and nearly filled the 8GB SD Card.

Fast-forwarding a bit … I frequent a ton of groups, if I were to guess a number I’d put it somewhere around 50 groups that I visit weekly (on Facebook, LinkedIn, and G+). I’ve got a handful of photography groups on Facebook that have been extremely helpful, supportive and engaging as well as design groups, business groups, illustration groups, blogging groups and well …. a bunch of groups. Though the wife let me upgrade to a Nikon D3200, this old GE can’t retire. I’ve found great little hands for it and it’s already paid off with some awesome, and sometimes hilarious photographs.

 

(I wanted to include links to the photography groups on Facebook, because the image below is from one of them, and I can’t remember which)

Sevier County Photographers

Photography for beginners!

Symbiostockers (this one is more for people looking to sell their content, still very engaging and supportive group)

Photography

Photoshop Showcase

 

Mock advertisement for the 2015 Ford Fiesta ST. Photograph by Nathan Holder. Driver, Matt Benham.
Mock advertisement for the 2015 Ford Fiesta ST. Photograph by Nathan Holder. Driver, Matt Benham.

In one of the groups this image came across the feed, I think Nathan Holder was talking about how he had to hang out the window of his friends car, to shoot the other car … and that he wanted to try a longer shutterspeed. I thought it was awesome work and told him that it’s definitely something that you’d see in an advertisement. I toyed with the idea a minute and went to find the MPG’s (one of the things this car boasts) and whatever from Fords website and in fact found the exact same sort of image being used. Granted, the ford image was probably taken with a camera that costs as much as my new house … or it might be entirely rendered using computers and software (worth approximately the same amount)  … It’s hard to say but, it brings up a fact about design. Great Design Starts with Great Imagery.

Screenshot from the Ford website of the same type of shot being used for their advertising.
Screenshot from the Ford website of the same type of shot being used for their advertising.

 

Classic Motors advertisement by Dallas Price. Published in The Richfield Reaper 4/8/15.
Classic Motors advertisement by Dallas Price. Published in The Richfield Reaper 4/8/15.

In fact, for many designers this is exactly the starting point. They say that a picture is worth a thousand words, and while … I know clients who would love to stick 1,000 words into a design, most I think understand that it isn’t going to be beneficial. I know that sometimes before I even start to break up a design task I’ll open my browser to our stock agency (Creative Outlet) and start looking for something that fits the theme. For smaller areas or spot colors I aim for an illustration but, a nice big photograph will make your designs much more … relatable, even better … a nice big photograph with people doing something will not only make your design more relatable, it will be personable. People look at these and subconsciously think, “that could be me” (sometimes it’s not even subconsciously). This Classic advertisement could have been significantly better, better images and less junk but, it illustrates a grid … and is an example of what I get to do.

 

I know that not all of us are designing advertisements, and we’re not all trying to shove products at consumers but, the same rule applies to logo design, poster design, billboards, album covers … and really everything that you see. In fact, even while reading this you are seeing design. Most of my favorite books have massive full page photographs and art sprinkled throughout. The best logos in the world have the perfect balance between graphic and text. These brands are so recognizable that after a time you don’t even need to see the logo, or only partially, to know their products and promotions.

 

There really aren’t many exceptions to this, unless you’re going for an extremely simplistic look. As a designer it’s your job to know when an image isn’t going to work, or isn’t fitting to the message but, most of the time. You’re going to be hunting for that perfect image that communicates your message, supports the theme, and fits the style.

Anyway, I suppose that’s all that I’ve got for today. Thank you for visiting!

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Artist behind new THON logo hoped to make “dreams come to life” – The Daily Collegian: Campus

-Antonella Crescimbeni One of the children gazes at the new THON Logo of 2015 at the THON Family Carnival on Sunday, November 16, 2014 at the White Building

By Melanie Brusseler | Collegian Staff Writer

 

 

-Antonella Crescimbeni One of the children gazes at the new THON Logo of 2015 at the THON Family Carnival on Sunday, November 16, 2014 at the White Building
-Antonella Crescimbeni
One of the children gazes at the new THON Logo of 2015 at the THON Family Carnival on Sunday, November 16, 2014 at the White Building

 

“Imagination,” “playfulness” and most importantly, “Empower the Dreamers” are the words Penn State graphic design student Kailyn Moore hoped to capture as she designed the 2015 Interfraternity Council/Panhellenic Dance Marathon logo.

 

Each year, for almost 20 years, students within the graphic design program have been involved in giving what graphic design professor Kristin Sommese said is a “a visual voice” to THON, in an effort to turn what used to be a collection of voices speaking about their organizations into a single cohesive identity system.
“We tried to help them make that something people would recognize throughout campus and internationally,” Sommese said.
From there a partnership between THON and the Penn State Graphic Design program formed.

 

With each year, and each new THON theme, seniors in the graphic design program must design potential logos as part of their curriculum. These are then presented, along with descriptions, to the THON executive committee to vote on.

 

It was announced this Sunday during the THON 2015 Family Carnival that Moore’s design, which features a child painting the night sky, had been chosen to represent this year’s theme “Empower the Dreamers.”
 

Moore (senior-graphic design) said her goal in designing the logo was to make it look like it could appear “straight from a child’s dream.”
 

“I remember always drawing and painting my dreams on paper when I was a child,” Moore said. “And that specifically inspired this concept of making our dreams come to life.”
 

Although she submitted three logos to the THON executive board, Moore said the one that was ultimately chosen was the product of the first image that came to mind after learning this year’s theme.
 

From that initial idea, Moore chose to incorporate such elements as the night sky, which she said is the universal symbol for dreaming. For this image Moore said she chose a color scheme based on purple and light blue — colors she considers relatively gender-neutral.
 

Within the logo there is a hidden double image, which Moore said many don’t notice at first glance. The child in the logo paints the face of the moon, and along with it another child’s silhouette, with the paintbrush in his hand forming the eye.
 

This double image serves as an example of simultaneity, Sommese said, which is a design technique sometimes used to transfer deeper messages. This double image and use of simultaneity was a way to add further meaning to the logo, Moore said, as it represents that THON is not just about THON children, but all children affected by the battle against pediatric cancer.
 

“That symbol of that child being in his painting represents the fact that this is about THON and all children past, present and future, and what that empowers us too,” Moore said.
Moore said she began the process of designing the logo by brainstorming ideas, sketching them out and crafting them digitally in Adobe Illustrator, which is the main tool used by the graphic design department to make its students’ ideas come to life.
 

Graphic design at Penn State, which is based out of a large studio in Borland Building, affectionately named “Borlandia” by students in the program, often works behind the scenes to contribute to events and programs around campus.

 

“Our class has also designed the homecoming logos and Movin’ On logos every year,” Moore said. “I think we do a lot of work for the university but a lot of people don’t really know that our program is responsible for that stuff.”

 

Although Moore said she was “incredibly shocked” when she found out her logo had been chosen to represent THON 2015, her work has been chosen to represent other large events around campus, including Homecoming 2014.
 

In the case of Homecoming 2014, Moore’s design was chosen because, much like her THON logo, it best embodied the theme of the event, and for her unique vision Brandon Rittenhouse, the executive director of Homecoming 2015, said.
 

“We liked her logo so much because it was so different from anything we had seen prior,” Rittenhouse (junior-graphic design) said. “She approaches the problem of designing a logo a bit differently, making her designs incredibly beautiful and something we haven’t seen in a while.”
 

As THON weekend looms closer, and the logo becomes more visible on campus after the THON merchandise sale, Moore hopes her work will come to represent the accomplishments of everyone involved in THON.
 

“I mainly hope that people think it captures the theme and look to it after THON weekend is over this year as something that represents everything we have achieved,” Moore said.
 

Melanie can be reached at [email protected] or (814) 865-1828. Follow her on Twitter at @brusselermel.

Winter, 2015 Family photos

Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah

Went up to Maple Grove this evening for some Winter photos. I had the ISO set too high for quite a few and they came out super grainy. Still got a few good shots I think.

Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah
Price family photos Winter 2015 taken at Maple Grove, Utah

 

 

– Insert Title Here –

Rain photo from January deathtothestockphoto.com. Question mark is just a regular ol' Helvetica question mark.
Rain photo from January deathtothestockphoto.com. Question mark is just a regular ol' Helvetica question mark.
Rain photo from January deathtothestockphoto.com. Question mark is just a regular ol’ Helvetica question mark.

To sum up 2014 in one word interesting. Designers never really stop working … Even when we entirely disconnect ourselves it’s always a subconscious process … Some designers do fairly well with letting go of past projects and disconnecting themselves with current work. While others, myself included, can dwell on them until we are literally sick.

There was a time during 2014 when I seriously questioned about what I was doing, where I was at and what I was really getting out of it. Recently I finished Debbie Millman’s “How to think like a great graphic designer” and confirmed to myself that quite a bit of my thoughts, feelings and actions are pretty normal, which is good because many people are perfectly content doing a job that they absolutely hate, with people that they absolutely hate, and do it every day for their entire lives … I’m not one of those people … and I don’t think I ever will be. I have a relatively fulfilling job and I honestly love it … even if currently there is no opportunity for growth.

One of the good parts about my job is that once it’s done … It’s done. There’s no going back, no adjusting the size or weight of this or that, no adjusting this color or the contrast. Nothing. There’s work to be done and a limited (sometimes extremely limited) amount of time to do it in, and I think I’ve learned a great deal from that. Sometimes I have to kick myself and carry on. This wasn’t really a terrible mistake but, an oversight none the less and I got a small earful for it. Our Holiday greeting photo ran right through the fold, making it difficult to see some of the faces (With our printing it’s not like you can see them anyway 😉 )

Christmas greetings page designed by Dallas Price. Published in The Richfield Reaper 12/24/2014.
Christmas greetings page designed by Dallas Price. Published in The Richfield Reaper 12/24/2014.

Lately, I’ve been struggling with motivation and ambition. (This is my first post in like a month, and I love to write) I’ve got a couple projects that I’ve procrastinated until I’m running right up to THEY NEED DONE NOW. I think one of the big reasons that I’ve been doing this is that they’re outside of my current ability, and require me to do research, plan and follow through while learning and doing something that isn’t entirely new but, outside of my comfort area.
When I get like this it reveals quite a bit about myself, not only can I be lazy but, I scare myself into not doing anything. I’ve literally been thinking about one of the projects none stop for two months, nearly all day every day. This project in particular requires quite a degree of infrastructure, planning and execution … while putting off that project another one sprung right up on me and I didn’t even see it coming.

 

2015 Best of the Best logo
2015 Best of the Best logo

One of the projects is the Reaper Best of the Best online ballot. While, I could just clear the database and make the required change, I really want to make something. Something that will last beyond this years contest. Now I’ve only got a couple weeks to make that happen, and here I am procrastinating … writing about procrastinating … 😉

Anyhow, I knew that I needed to write something since it’s been a while but, I really had no idea what to write. If you enjoyed this post please follow me on any of the social media channels or subscribe by e-mail on the right sidebar.

The 5 Elements of Great Graphic Design

Advertisement designed for Ogden's Superstore by Dallas Price (starburst compliments of Jennifer Dorgan) background vector art by Creative Outlet. Published in The Richfield Reaper 11/12/2014.
Advertisement designed for Ogden's Superstore by Dallas Price (starburst compliments of Jennifer Dorgan) background vector art by Creative Outlet. Published in The Richfield Reaper 11/12/2014.
Advertisement designed for Ogden’s Superstore by Dallas Price (starburst compliments of Jennifer Dorgan) background vector art by Creative Outlet. Published in The Richfield Reaper 11/12/2014.

It’s been a while since I have posted, as the holiday season grows nearer other priorities keep getting in the way of writing a good post :(. So I did a bit of searching for something to post today and stumbled upon this great read by Kimming Yap just for fun I’ll add some images and stuff:

Great graphic design consists of so much more than imaginative color schemes and fashionable layout; exceptional graphic design possesses five essential elements to give a supreme balance of creativity, clarity and impact, as will be demonstrated by the deft yet free hands and minds of the best creative agencies in Singapore. Below we will discuss these five elements and cover the integral parts of each, providing you with a much more concise understanding of what connotes a great graphic design masterpiece.

The 5 Elements of Great Graphic Design

Visual Hierarchy

By definition visual hierarchy in the graphic design context consists of manipulating visual content by prioritizing it and subsequently organizing it in a manner that will effectively get a point across. Visual hierarchy is one of the backbone principles of graphic design, and applies to every form of media you can possibly experience. This element is not simply about the image content; any text which is being considered for use is to be part of the arrangement process as well.

It is important to pay close attention to contrasts when being attentive to this element. Contrasts in color, context, size, and shape need to be closely monitored and anything which distracts from the key point should be properly adjusted.

Balance in Design Layout

Have you have ever looked at an advertisement of any medium and found a specific area of the visual that continually takes away your attention from the main focus? Empty spaces in some areas and overcrowding in others can throw the brain’s ability to retain attention into an uproar. Great graphic design will have all visual content and text arranged in a manner which is balanced evenly, and complimentary visuals or text will not crowd or distract from the point of the design. Each design will have a main point of reference and all other content is supportive, thus, supportive content should bring the point more clearly into focus rather than fog things up for the viewer.

Grid Use

A grid is made up of intersecting lines, horizontal, vertical, and/or angular, which can be straight or curved in appearance. Grids are two dimensional, and to the layman resemble nothing more than a bunch of tiny little boxes.

Grid use in graphic design will contribute greatly to the effectiveness of the design produced. Use of a grid assists in proper content placement, helping to achieve balance and providing depth and an essence of tangibility to the design. Because grid use assists in effective content placement its use contributes to the greatness of any design in which it has been implemented.

Proper use of White Space

The use of white space in the graphic realm can make or break the design and any potential it has for greatness. White space is any area free of markings or content of any kind, including margins and any areas of space between groups of text or other content. White space can be used effectively without the viewer even being aware of it; this is graphic design genius. White space can also undermine an entire concept, consequently destroying what could have been a great design. Proper use of white space should allow the viewer to breathe while drinking in the design; it should not complete the piece, rather it should dance with the content in unison.

The Marriage of Positive and Negative Space: Visual Harmony

The essence of using white space properly is the mastery of balance of both negative (white) and positive (content-filled) spaces. You cannot master white or negative space use without having used positive space effectively as well; this is the balance that needs to be achieved in all your designs.

To achieve great masterpieces of Graphic Design Singapore, creative agencies must have the entire world in their mind’s eye, and they must be able to express that effectively through their medium. The above five elements will encompass any great piece of graphic design, and it will not be difficult to identify each element with a trained eye. The intended viewer, on the other hand, will see nothing but symmetry and aesthetic perfection which is compelling in its purpose. Sharpen the attention you pay to the five elements, and begin to produce great graphic designs today.

 

 

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20 Epic Advertisement Designs

I thought I’d do something a little bit different this week and share with you some advertisements that I think are really cool. It takes a lot of work to become a brand that can pull these off, and the ad agencies that do them communicate the message clearly, and in some cases with only art and a logo. It’s pretty incredible.

"Blend In" This advertisement by DDB for Zoo Safari is definitely epic.
“Blend In” This advertisement by DDB for Zoo Safari is definitely epic.
Band-aid - strong enough for Hulk. Advertising is all about simplicity, with a well recognized brand all you need is an image and a logo. This works ...
Band-aid – strong enough for Hulk. Advertising is all about simplicity, with a well recognized brand all you need is an image and a logo. This works …
That drill packs a punch. Check out how it warped the wood in this Bosch ad.
That drill packs a punch. Check out how it warped the wood in this Bosch ad.
This advertisement by BBA for Clinica Mosquera is epic and memorable.
This advertisement by BBA for Clinica Mosquera is epic and memorable.
I love this idea! So many people eat nasty fast food for every meal, this ad for Dallas Farmers Market by Firehouse features fresh vegetables in a french fry box. "Fresh & Tasty".
I love this idea! So many people eat nasty fast food for every meal, this ad for Dallas Farmers Market by Firehouse features fresh vegetables in a french fry box. “Fresh & Tasty”.
Kind of a creepy Duracell advertisement idea by Grey. "Some toys never die" could definitely scar some children.
Kind of a creepy Duracell advertisement idea by Grey. “Some toys never die” could definitely scar some children.
A robot pooping! This advertisement by Euro RSCG is pushing recycling your electronics.
A robot pooping! This advertisement by Euro RSCG is pushing recycling your electronics.
This awesome ad campaign for Expedia was created by Ogilvy & Mather uses airport IATA codes to make their point. "Find whatever floats your boat"
This awesome ad campaign for Expedia was created by Ogilvy & Mather uses airport IATA codes to make their point. “Find whatever floats your boat”
M&Ms advertisement design raising awareness for their personalizable M&Ms "Communication Just got Sweeter"
M&Ms advertisement design raising awareness for their personalizable M&Ms “Communication Just got Sweeter”

Epic advertisement design by TBWA featuring this french fry box carved out of a potato.
Epic advertisement design by TBWA featuring this french fry box carved out of a potato.




Mcdonalds wants you to schedule your next birthday party at their playplace and "Make Billy their problem". I think I know this billy kid.
Mcdonalds wants you to schedule your next birthday party at their playplace and “Make Billy their problem”. I think I know this billy kid.
"Poke a stick at a grizzly bear" I just thought this was a cute ad from the McCann ad agency. Apparently there is a music video and game at dumbwaystodie.com
“Poke a stick at a grizzly bear” I just thought this was a cute ad from the McCann ad agency. Apparently there is a music video and game at dumbwaystodie.com
National Geographic perfectly says that "Shool can't teach them everything" in this advertisement by FoxP2.
National Geographic perfectly says that “Shool can’t teach them everything” in this advertisement by FoxP2.
"Get in touch with your inner child ... and let it play in traffic" Though, I wouldn't recommend letting your children play in trafic, I love the illustrations on this ad for Ottawa International Animation Festival by the McMillan ad agency.
“Get in touch with your inner child … and let it play in traffic” Though, I wouldn’t recommend letting your children play in trafic, I love the illustrations on this ad for Ottawa International Animation Festival by the McMillan ad agency.

 

Play-doh can be made into anything appaerently ad agency DDB knows that and uses it in this epic ad design
Play-doh can be made into anything appaerently ad agency DDB knows that and uses it in this epic ad design
"One story, two points" - Sharpie twin tip. Great comic style advertisement for Sharpie markers by Draftfcb
“One story, two points” – Sharpie twin tip. Great comic style advertisement for Sharpie markers by Draftfcb
"Turn on your adventure" This Volkswagen advertisement features a safari as teeth of a car key.
“Turn on your adventure” This Volkswagen advertisement features a safari as teeth of a car key.
"Creativity has no boundaries" This awesome advertisement design for Wacom's popular Bamboo tablets by Maria Molina shows just that.
“Creativity has no boundaries” This awesome advertisement design for Wacom‘s popular Bamboo tablets by Maria Molina shows just that.
"Feeding your cat's instincts" ... I love this ad idea by AMVBBDO for Whiskas cat food. I wonder what's going to happen when that kitty catches that Gazelle?
“Feeding your cat’s instincts” … I love this ad idea by AMVBBDO for Whiskas cat food. I wonder what’s going to happen when that kitty catches that Gazelle?

 

Velociraptor, get back to the television. This Panasonic ad is a stunning design.
Velociraptor, get back to the television. This Panasonic ad is a stunning design.

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Source: http://www.creativebloq.com/inspiration/print-ads-1233780

Advertisement Design Review

Advertisement design by Graphic Designer Dallas Price for Jorgensen Ford. Published in The Richfield Reaper 10/22/2014

I’ve been skipping out on advertisement review for the past little while so I thought that it’d be a good subject for the day. This is an advertisement I designed for the 10/22 publication of The Richfield Reaper.

Advertisement design by Graphic Designer Dallas Price for Jorgensen Ford. Published in The Richfield Reaper 10/22/2014
Advertisement design by Graphic Designer Dallas Price for Jorgensen Ford. Published in The Richfield Reaper 10/22/2014

As most of my readers know I get these full page car ads on such short notice that I don’t have an opportunity to spend a great deal of time on them but, overall I’d have to say that this is one of my best advertisements this year. I do wish that they wouldn’t try to highlight the collision center in their sales ad but, I understand their situation.

I noticed as this was coming off the press that I made the makes of each vehicle green, except for the highlighted car, oversight there. The biggest thing that bugs me about this ad is how busy this gets from just under half the page and down.

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Stuck in graphic design hell, how do you get out?

I was in a Wacom interview with Rod Maxwell and Rayce Bird earlier this week. When a question came in from Vince Collier that kind of hit home with me because, I’ve been there myself … In fact, I’ll bet every designer has.

I’m currently stuck in Graphic Design Hell and I’m trying to get back to my first love of illustration and character design. I already LIVE in Photoshop and Illustrator. Two questions, 1. What OTHER Software do you recommend learning? 2. Where do you recommend frequenting to try and break in to the Character Design world? – Vince Collier


Rayce answers the question extremely well … It’s not about the apps that you use, it’s all about the art/design that you’re aiming to create. At the end of the day Photoshop isn’t art, Illustrator isn’t art, a tool is just a tool but, what you’ve made is art.

For uh, digital illustration? I do like sketchbook pro, I think that it’s a good app I think it’s kind of a simple layout”
“It’s important to not get caught in the tool, if photoshop or illustrator define what you can do as an artist then, that’s gonna hurt ya . You have to know what you want to do as an artist, and use the tool -Rayce Bird

Now, I might not be a creature developer, or even want to be but, it seems like Vince would like to be. I love layouts, mostly for print advertisements, big layouts, small layouts and nearly everything in between. I get stuck in graphic design hell quite often … loading up InDesign, Photoshop, and Illustrator to create yet another effective, yet monotonous advertisement.

I find myself loving pencil and paper and jumping back and forth in my art, taking photos of scribbles and then trying to vectorize them for my silly illustrations at 1dollarimages but currently, I’m having a rekindling of interest in web design. Brushing off the css rust and dusting off some books so that I can get the look and feel that I’m after for my latest hairballed idea has brought some passion back into my day, or maybe given me a new sense of purpose.

How do you get out of “Graphic Design Hell”? Leave your comments below or on any of my social channels and as always like, favorite, share, retweet, +1 or whatever if you enjoyed this post and follow me for more.